Coding using #voicecommands is very much possible. A small but growing community of individuals has developed a workaround for problems like #repetitivestraininjury using #codingbyvoicecommands. This requires two types of software: (a) a #speechrecognitionengine and (b) a #platformforvoicecoding. Dragon from Nuance, a #speechrecognitionsoftwaredeveloper is widely used for #programmingbyvoicecommands; both #Windows and #Mac OS versions are available. On the platform side, #Talon and #VoiceCode (both for Mac OS alone) are popular.

#Linuxbasedplatformsforvoiceprogramming such as #Aenea are also available, these are free and #opensource, and enable voice-programming functionality using an open-source #Pythonframework, the #DragonFly that links actions with voice commands recognized by a speech-recognition engine.

Unlike the #virtualpersonalassistants such as #Siri or #Alexa, Talon and VoiceCode don’t do #naturallanguageprocessing, so vocalized instructions have to perfectly match the commands that are already familiar to the system. However, both platforms use #continuouscommandrecognition, so users needn’t pause in between commands; an advantage over Siri and Alexa. Furtherer, instead of English words, short vocalizations such as ‘sup’ (search up), ‘mara’ (mark paragraph), and ‘slap’ (hit return), are used for giving the commands.

However, Aenea, #Caster, and Talon feature #dynamicgrammar, a tool which constantly updates the corpus of words that the software can recognize based on which applications are open; meaning users can give commands using English words without causing confusion.

Furthermore, Talon can also replace a #computermouse with #eyetracking using a #Tobii4ceyetracker. Other #eyemousingsystems usually require the eye tracker as well as the #headtrackinghardware, such as the #TrackIR from NaturalPoint.

Voice command requires a #headsetormicrophone at the very least. The software can also cost several hundred dollars; both VoiceCode and #DragonProfessional cost $300, a pop. Talon is free, but requires a speech-recognition engine. Users usually share their set-up details and configuration files on sites such as #Slack and #GitHub.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,